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Dogs News -- ScienceDaily
  • The eyes have it: Cats put sight over smell in finding food
    Cats may prefer to use their eyes rather than follow their nose when it comes to finding the location of food, according to new research by leading animal behaviorists.
  • Possible biological trigger for canine bone cancer found
    The biological mechanism that may give some cancer cells the ability to form tumors in dogs has been identified by researchers. The recent study uncovered an association between the increased expression of a particular gene in tumor cells and more aggressive behavior in a form of canine bone cancer. It may also have implications for human cancers by detailing a new pathway for tumor formation.
  • Wildlife at risk around the globe: Scientists say vaccinating endangered carnivores of increasing importance
    Experts from around the world focused on the threat that canine distemper virus poses to the conservation of increasingly fragmented populations of threatened carnivores. While canine distemper has been known for many years as a problem affecting domestic dogs, the virus has been appearing in new areas and causing disease and mortality in a wide range of wildlife species, including tigers and lions. In fact, many experts agree that the virus should not be called “canine distemper” virus at all, given the diversity of species it infects.
  • Dogs know that smile on your face
    Dogs can tell the difference between happy and angry human faces, according to a new study. The discovery represents the first solid evidence that an animal other than humans can discriminate between emotional expressions in another species, the researchers say.
  • The first kobuviruses described from Africa
    Scientists have genetically describe the first kobuviruses to be reported from Africa. The results show that the viruses are less host-specific than previously assumed.

American Veterinary Medical Assoc. Announcements