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Dogs News -- ScienceDaily
  • Big-game jitters: Coyotes no match for wolves' hunting prowess
    As wolf populations plummeted, the eastern coyote assumed the role of apex predator in forests along the Atlantic Coast. New research, however, shows that the eastern coyote is no match for the wolf. While the eastern coyote can bring down moose and other large prey, it prefers to attack smaller animals and to scavenge.
  • Minitablets help medicate picky cats
    Of all pets, cats are often considered the most difficult ones to medicate. Very small minitablets with flavors or flavor coatings can help cat owners commit to the treatment and make cats more compliant to it, while making it easier to regulate dosage and administer medication flexibly.
  • Securing the future of cattle production in Africa
    A world-first genetic study of cattle in Africa has revealed clues which could help secure the future of meat and dairy production on the continent. Scientists in England and East Africa carried out the study to help inform future breeding programs and stop indigenous cattle from dying out.
  • Breathtaking gene discovery in Dalmatian dogs
    A novel gene associated with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in dogs has been uncovered by scientists. The new research on this fatal disease may also help us understand the mechanisms of respiratory diseases in humans.
  • Brain scans of service-dog trainees help sort weaker recruits from the pack
    Brain scans of canine candidates to assist people with disabilities can help predict which dogs will fail a rigorous service training program, a study by finds. The study found that fMRI boosted the ability to identify dogs that would ultimately fail service-dog training to 67 percent, up from about 47 percent without the use of fMRI.

American Veterinary Medical Assoc. Announcements