Leishmaniasis Study

Sandfly

Donate Today

Neapolitan Mastiff Samples Needed

Neapolitan Rescue
Petfinder Visit Petfinder for available rescues
Rabies Challenge Fund
Rabies Challenge Fund
Learn more about the Rabies Vaccine
Canine Health Foundation
Canine Health Foundation
Error
  • Error loading feed data.
Newsfeeds
Canine Research News PDF Print E-mail

Get the latest developments in Veterinary Research delivered to your screen every day!

Check back often as these feeds are updated frequently.

 

Science Daily Announcements

Dogs News -- ScienceDaily
  • New tech aims to improve communication between dogs, humans
    A suite of technologies that can be used to enhance communication between dogs and humans has been developed by researchers who say that it has applications in everything from search and rescue to service dogs to training our pets.
  • Animal therapy reduces anxiety, loneliness symptoms in college students
    Animal-assisted therapy can reduce symptoms of anxiety and loneliness among college students, according to researchers who provided animal-assisted therapy to 55 students in a group setting at a small arts college. They found a 60 percent decrease in self-reported anxiety and loneliness symptoms following animal-assisted therapy, in which a registered therapy dog was under the supervision of a licensed mental health practitioner.
  • Mutation associated with cleft palate in humans, dogs identified
    Scientists studying birth defects in humans and purebred dogs have identified an association between cleft lip and cleft palate -- conditions that occur when the lip and mouth fail to form properly during pregnancy -- and a mutation in the ADAMTS20 gene.
  • Loss of big predators could leave herbivores in a thorny situation
    Global declines in carnivore populations could embolden plant eaters to increasingly dine on succulent vegetation, driving losses in plant and tree biodiversity, according to new research published in Science.
  • How the fruit fly could help us sniff out drugs and bombs
    A fly's sense of smell could be used in new technology to detect drugs and bombs, new research has found. Brain scientists were surprised to find that the ‘nose’ of fruit flies can identify odors from illicit drugs and explosive substances almost as accurately as wine odor, which the insects are naturally attracted to because it smells like their favorite food, fermenting fruit.

American Veterinary Medical Assoc. Announcements