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Dogs News -- ScienceDaily
  • Egg-free surrogate chickens produced in bid to save rare breeds
    Hens that do not produce their own chicks have been developed for use as surrogates to lay eggs from rare breeds. The advance -- using gene-editing techniques -- could help to boost breeding of endangered birds, as well as improving production of commercial hens, researchers say.
  • Novel socio-ecological approach helps identifying suitable wolf habitats in human-dominated landscapes
    About one third of the Swiss landscape offers suitable wolf habitat. Nonetheless, there is only a small fraction thereof where the wolf is tolerated by local communities. Those regions – characterized by both favorable environmental conditions and a positive attitude towards the wolf – are identified as candidate regions for the successful short to medium-term wolf expansion, according to a study.
  • Can’t we all just get along – like India’s cats and dogs?
    Three carnivores -- tigers, leopards, and dholes (Asian wild dog) -- seemingly in direct competition with one other, are living side by side with surprisingly little conflict, new study in India shows.
  • Gene therapy treats muscle-wasting disease in dogs
    Dogs with an inherited muscle-wasting disorder that was treated with a single infusion of corrective gene therapy were indistinguishable from normal animals one year later. Puppies with this naturally occurring, fatal genetic mutation and babies with the same defective gene have several similar symptoms. Scientists found a way to safely replace the disease-causing MTM gene with a healthy gene throughout the entire musculature of affected dogs, and are now trying to determine the most effective dosage and timing.
  • Ebolaviruses need very few mutations to cause disease in new host species
    Ebola is one of the world's most virulent diseases, though rodent species such as guinea pigs, rats and mice are not normally susceptible to it. However, through repeated infection of a host animal, Ebola virus strains can be generated that replicate and cause disease within new host rodent species.

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